Showing posts with label Gary Vee. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Gary Vee. Show all posts

Wednesday, August 7, 2019

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball | Review, Checklist, Box Break, and Autographs

One of Topps’ most buzzworthy products has hit the shelves in the form of 2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball. The collecting community has engaged in a spirited debate over the set’s inclusion of celebrities, entertainers, and even an egg alongside Major League Baseball stars. Whether it is entrepreneur Gary Vaynerchuk, Yahoo Sports personality Mike Oz, or former Double Dare host Marc Summers, this year’s Allen and Ginter Baseball has plenty to keep a wide range of fans happy.

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball Base Set, Short Prints, and Checklist

Allen and Ginter’s exceptional design is the main reason why the set remains popular with collectors. The painted posed shots position the players in an attractive way that stands out against the rest of Topps’ releases. Our review box yielded this year’s four top upstarts—Pete Alonso, Vladimir Guerrero Jr., Jeff McNeil, and Fernando Tatis Jr.

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball / Topps
The 350-card set contains 50 short prints, numbered 351-400. The numbering gap is a quirk that collectors should be aware of when collating their sets. The base cards only have two parallels—Gold Hot Box parallels and 1/1 Glossy cards.

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball Minis / Topps
Each pack also contains one mini card. These minis are where Allen and Ginter hide the variations. Base and short-print minis feature the following variations - A&G Logo Back, Black, No Number, Brooklyn Back (#/25), Gold, Wood 1/1, Glossy 1/1, Framed Printing Plates 1/1.

Click here for the complete checklist.

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball Inserts

To rip or not to rip? That is the question for collectors who land a serial numbered rip card. Inside these rip cards are short-printed stained-glass minis, metal minis, or red mini autographs. The lure of what hides behind the rip cards are enough to push collectors to carefully tear apart the sealed card in search of a bigger hit.

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Inserts / Topps
Full-sized baseball-themed inserts include the Baseball Star Signs and Ginter Greats cards. Incredible Equipment, Mares and Stallions, and History of Flight are some of the non-sports insert sets. Mini inserts highlight Collectible Canines, Trains, Blue Ribbon Contests. As an added twist, some In Bloom Mini cards can be planted and grown. How’s that for a collectible?

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Mini Inserts / Topps
2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Inserts / Topps

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball Relics and Autographs

Each box guarantees a mix of three relics or autographs, with most being framed minis. A select few have standard signed cards, including Vladimir Guerrero Jr. and Yusei Kikuchi. Serial numbered single and dual autographed book cards make for great display pieces.

There are two different standard sized MLB relic cards, and hobby boxes contain framed mini relics of players matched up with subway tokens, as well as fossil and arrowhead relics.

The box provided for this review yielded three relics, one of which was from Hall of Famer Steve Carlton.
2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Relics / Topps

2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball Box Break and Final Thoughts

Collectors have been loud on social media voicing their love or hate for this set. Some have embraced the diversity of Allen and Ginter; however, others can’t fathom non-baseball players with cards alongside their cardboard heroes. Despite the noise, this set gives collectors a welcome diversion from the hardcore prospecting of Topps’ other releases. Listening to Mike Oz share the joy of being in the 2019 Topps Allen and Ginter Baseball set is a compelling reason enough to add a box to your collection.






Monday, April 22, 2019

Will Gary Vaynerchuk push the sports card market to new heights?

Gary Vaynerchuk, the entrepreneur and social media giant, has set his eyes on the sports card industry with a laser-like focus that could quickly elevate the hobby back into national prominence. While some may think "Gary Vee" is trying to ride the wave of the most hyped prospects; however, he is no stranger to collecting. Vaynerchuk built his chops in the late 1980s and early 1990s, making thousands of dollars as a teenager selling baseball cards at local shows.

Gary Vaynerchuk / Twitter

One just has to look at stacks of Todd Van Poppel and Gregg Jefferies rookies from the sports card boom as a reminder that collecting was designed to be a hobby instead of a venture into an alternate stock market. Despite the historical warnings, collectors are diving into prospects hoping to find the next Mike Trout while sidestepping the likes of Greg “Toe” Nash. With new money flying into the sports card market, will the top cards reach new highs in the coming year?




Modern-era baseball cards will always lag well behind their pre-WWII counterparts, but recent history shows that modern-era cards are starting to attract more lucrative bids. Just six months after a Shohei Ohtani rookie card sold for a modern-era record of $184,000, a Mike Trout rookie card has attracted a $92,000 bid on eBay and could climb higher. According to SBD, on-field greatness only goes so far in upping a card's value, but if Trout continues to stake his claim to the title of best (non-steroid) player since Willie Mays, they set the odds at 1/2 that a Trout card becomes the most valuable modern-era card within the next decade.

2011 Mike Trout Gold Canary Diamond / PSA

With Gary Vee’s massive following turning their attention towards the new generation of sports cards (Vaynerchuk has 1.88 million Twitter followers as compared to Topps’ 125,000), we could get a win-win on both sides of the hobby. Excited hustlers and entrepreneurs could easily drive up the higher ends of the card market while simultaneously drawing an increasing amount of casual fans back into the joys of collecting.