Showing posts with label All-Star Game. Show all posts
Showing posts with label All-Star Game. Show all posts

Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Rare footage of David Cone pitching in the 1986 Puerto Rican Winter League All-Star Game

Fresh off of his rookie season with the Kansas City Royals, David Cone went to the Puerto Rican Winter League (Liga de BĂ©isbol Profesional Roberto Clemente) to further hone his skills. By the end of the winter season, Cone was a champion, saving Game 6 of the Caribbean Series for Caguas en route to their title.

David Cone in the 1986 LBPPR All-Star Game / Joe Towers
Joe Towers (@joetowerscards) recently posted footage of Cone pitching in the LBPPR All-Star game, flashing the eventual brilliance that led him to five World Series championships and the 1994 American League Cy Young Award. Only a few short months after this appearance, the Royals traded Cone to the New York Mets, which put him right in the middle of the baseball spotlight for the incumbent World Series champs.


Click here to read more about David Cone and his later brush with baseball immortality.


Thursday, July 18, 2013

Video - Mariano Rivera entering the 2013 All-Star Game to Enter Sandman

Mariano Rivera / @ExamineBaseball - Twitter
Watch video of Mariano Rivera, the greatest closer ever in baseball, entering the 2013 All-Star Game at Citi Field to a prolonged standing ovation from the crowd. Rivera, 43, pitched a scoreless 8th inning, in his 13th and final All-Star Game.

Thursday, July 5, 2012

Mets legend Ed Kranepool disappointed with David Wright's reserve selection

Ed Kranepool holds many distinctions in 50-year association with the New York Mets. At 17, he was the youngest member of the inaugural 1962 team, and when he finished his career in 1979, he left as their all-time leader in hits, at-bats and games played. Tuesday afternoon, Kranepool spread some good will as part of the Mets Citi Tuesdays program at Citbank in Huntington Station.

Ed Kranepool signs an autograph at Citibank in Huntington Square
“I’ve been representing the Mets for 50 years," Kranepool said. "I signed in 1962, so it’s been a long association and most of it has been good. Representing here with Citibank has been great. They support the alumni program [and] they create the programs we participate in. I enjoy meeting all of the bankers and their customers and it’s a great support level that Citibank has offered the Mets and got behind them with sponsorship; they’re doing a lot of good things for the community.”

With David Wright on the heels of Kranepool’s all-time franchise hits record, the third baseman’s snub by the fans for the starting nod for the All-Star Game did not sit well with Kranepool.

“First of all, you want to get the fans involved, but I think they have too much of a say right now. I think it is a disgrace that David Wright is not the starting third baseman for the National League,” he said. “He’s hitting .360, driving in runs, [and] playing every day. He’s made a tremendous comeback. The other gentleman is having a good season, but not a David Wright season. All you have to do is check the record, check the book. There is no reason [that he shouldn’t be starting].”

Kranepool suggested that the current voting system should undergo a facelift.

“He loses by so many votes, c’mon," he said. "I think the fans should be involved, it’s their game, but I don’t think their vote should carry [the whole thing]. They should have a portion of it. Let the coaches and managers vote and the sportswriters vote. Two out of three wins and you mark it up.”

The discussion of Wright’s oversight by the fans roused up memories of Kranepool’s selection to the 1965 All-Star Game. Only 20 years old, Kranepool found himself surrounded by the likes of Willie Mays, Hank Aaron, Roberto Clemente and Sandy Koufax on the National League squad.

“That was a tremendous feat for myself, I was only 20 when I made the All-Star team,” Kranepool recalled.

As excited that Kranepool was to be representing the Mets in Minnesota, he would have enjoyed it more if Philadelphia Phillies manager Gene Mauch would have called Kranepool’s number off of the bench.

“I didn’t play in the game," he said. "I was disappointed … It’s kind of frustrating because I never made it again. You want to play. … What’s the sense of sending a guy to the All-Star Game, if he’s not going to play? Not that you want the three days off, you’d rather be in the All-Star Game, but if you’re going there, I want to say I played in the game. Let the country see you play the game.”



While he acknowledged that the All-Star team managers have been more aware of getting everyone involved in the mid-summer classic; however, he still thinks the game can stand a few minor adjustments.

“They do a better job of managing the players today in the game; they get everybody in, but I think they should have free substitution with a couple of players," he said. "They ought to mark before the game, two-to-three guys who play a lot of positions and keep them around. If you put them in the game, you’re allowed to remove them, [to] get everybody in the game. … They should change certain rules. Baseball in certain ways is trying to make changes and other ways, they’re antiquated in their positioning.”

Wednesday, July 7, 2010

Is Jason Heyward the second coming of Hank Aaron?

With all of the talk surrounding Jason Heyward making the National League all-star team, his rookie season bears many comparisons to another 20-year-old Braves phenom, Hank Aaron. While Heyward has another 20 years to go to fill the shoes of his mentor, one can't help but compare the two right fielders as rookies. Similar in their strong builds, youthful exuberance, sweet swings and position; this generation could quite possibly be watching the second coming of Aaron develop before their eyes.



Both players spent minimal time in the minor leagues, with Aaron playing 224 games and Heyward playing 238 before entering the majors at the age of 20. After torrid spring trainings (Aaron's aided by the injury of Bobby Thomson's ankle) they were named the starting right fielders for their clubs and quickly captivated the attention of the fans, media and their teammates.

Again, while premature, as we approach the all-star break, here is a statistical comparison of the first halves of Aaron and Heyward's rookie seasons. If this is any indicator of what lies ahead for Heyward, we very well might be seeing greatness in the making.


Hank Aaron 1954 rookie year first and second half splits
I Split G GS PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB ROE BAbip tOPS+ sOPS+
1st Half 76 74 325 297 40 85 20 3 11 45 1 2 22 24 .286 .337 .485 .822 144 8 2 2 2 0 4 .280 113 123
2nd Half 46 39 184 171 18 46 7 3 2 24 1 0 6 15 .269 .294 .380 .675 65 5 1 4 2 0 3 .282 76 87
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/7/2010.

Jason Heyward 2010 rookie year first half stats as of 7/7/10
Split G GS PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB ROE BAbip tOPS+ sOPS+
1st Half 71 67 303 255 41 64 13 3 11 45 5 4 42 68 .251 .366 .455 .821 116 5 5 0 1 2 9 .299 100 124
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 7/7/2010.